Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling - Inventory

"People cannot be managed. Inventories can be managed, but people must be led" #lead4growth #quote #leadership
 
Inventory - an itemized list of current assets.

When you change roles, or add new ones, it can be helpful to define and inventory all of the areas of responsibility. As Moms it's way too easy to just continue adding roles and responsibilities, thinking it's easier to do it all ourselves, or it's not the kids' problem, or dh is already too busy. That will quickly lead to burn-out, resentment, dropped balls and break-downs. You can't do it all.

Areas of Responsibility:
Work, Home, Home Schooling, Self

Work: You know your specific roles for work: Biz Owner, contractor, manager, employee, teacher, doctor, waitress- with all that entails- uniform, professional licensing and appearance, transportation, tools, etc. If you have set times and places for work, all the better. If you work from home, you need to create space- both physical and time-wise so that work stays contained. Setting regular office and phone hours will help create space and time for other things.

Home- Home roles are best negotiated with your Significant Other and any other people who works/live with you; Regular, weekly and monthly chores such as loading and unloading the dishwasher, paying the bills, taking care of the car and taxes, laundry, shopping, cooking, clean-up, etc. In our home, the kids have regular jobs and weekly jobs. Who does what when. The more this is managed, the less stressful. For instance, if laundry is kept up no one is shuffling through a the dirty clothes pile looking for shirts and socks. Every one's level of comfort is different. I really abhor a dirty bathroom but can't be bothered to dust often. Define your "bug" list (you know, the things that bug you), decide what bugs you most and manage that first.

Home Schooling - curriculum and activity research, purchasing, scheduling, implementing, transcribing if necessary. Out-sourced classes and activities. Who pays when, who transports, who manages homework and answers questions and keeps the kids on task. When you are working and homeschooling, the tendency is to fit homeschooling in wherever it fits. It's helped my kids to try to continue with the pre-established routine as much as possible. They want to have times when they don't have homeschooling hanging over their head and they have real free time to hang out side, play with kittens and read whatever the choose. I've had to set boundaries on myself because my tendency is to try to fit in one more thing.

Self - physical, mental, spiritual, social. This is the area that always seems to get short-changed. Make time and space in your life to do things that care for yourself- physical exercise, spiritual discipline, mental stimulation-beyond your work life and some kind of social outlet beyond mere social obligation. This always seems to be the areas to get short-changed so be intentional and focused on how you are going to care for your-self. You know the crashing airplane story, right?  Give yourself oxygen first so that you can save the lives of others. You are no good to anybody dead.

SET BOUNDARIES

There are ledgers for your time and energy. What you expend for one thing is no longer available for something else. We don't have to do it all, or apologize for having limits. In fact, it's healthier is we set limits on ourselves and others demand for our time and attention. The jobs I've had this year have deeply curtailed any reading time I've had so for the first time in 4 years I haven't read a book a week. In fact, I haven't finished a book this year yet!  Last year, we didn't plant a garden. A the end of this semester we will seriously re-evaluate some of the groups we've belonged to. Frankly, there needs to be a high enough return in areas to make them worth investing in.

DELEGATE
What things can you get rid of or outsource? Homeschooling might be the easiest thing to outsource: Co-op for us has always been a good investment because my kid have gotten quality art and choral, along with a unit study once a week. Some of the on-line classes we've taken have been phenomenal investments of time and money, not to mention great training for the kids in classroom behavior and expectations. Some of the DVD courses that we've invested in have been world class (Roman Roads Media). I am not of the opinion that homeschooling means you teach every.single.thing.

Housework- I've always believed that if you live in a house, you are partly responsible for cleaning it and contributing. Everyone helps with laundry, kitchen, laundry, yard work, re-build projects. If I could afford it, I'd hire a maid once a month or at least once a quarter. I love clean but I hate cleaning. Seriously, who wouldn't rather read a book?!

Work- Tim Ferris in The Four Hour Work Week made some excellent points about virtual assistants. They might actually be worth the money, so it's something to investigate if your job justifies it. Make use of planner apps and docs. I have fallen in love with dropbox this year; such an easy way to share and save info from anywhere.

I haven't really found anyone to effectively work-out for me yet, but personal trainers abound and books on tape get book read, even if not by you.

Inventory is on-going but easy at obvious points of evaluation- for work, during reviews, for homeschool, at the end of semesters, or year end.

Call to Action
Inventory your ares of responsbility
Determine 4 things that you can outsource or delegate.


Be sure to stop by my fellow Crewbies for some more great reading this week.
Kathy @ Kathys Cluttered Mind ~ Fieldtripping Fun
Leah @ As We Walk Along the Road ~ Great Kids Reads
Shalynne @ Wonderfully Chaotic ~ Birth and Babies
Lisa Marie @ The Canadian Homeschooler ~ Canadian Teachers Pay Teachers Stores
Kemi @ Homemaking Organized ~ Homekeeping for Girls and Boys
Heather @ Only Passionate Curiosity ~ Planning Your Homeschool Year
Nikki @ Angels of Heart ~ Easter: The Cross for Preschoolers
Jenn @ Treasuring Life's Blessings ~ Family Friendly Finger Food
Lisa @ Golden Grasses ~ The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling
Also be sure to head over to Schoolhouse Review Crew Blog to see what all 60 of my fellow crew members are blogging about this week for their 5 day blog hop!

@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Victus Study Skills -TOS Review

 
 
Victus Study Skills Review
We recently had the opportunity to review the Victus Study Skills System and used the  Student Workbook and Teacher Edition. You know I love Dorothy Sayers, and anything with a quote by her on the front cover, is almost a shoe in for me:

"For the sole true end of education is simply this:
To teach men how to learn for themselves;
and whatever instruction fails to do this is an effort spent in vain."
 
The ability is something we expect from every student. Often, however, we fail to take time to teach the actual skills required in order to be an effective student. In fact, maybe you aren't even aware that there are tools that you can learn and teach in order to really rock at studying.

Victus Study Skills System  delivers an explicit system that allows the student to own the ability to study. Regardless of whether something is a favorite or dreaded subject, their is genuine interest or genuine boredom exhibited, by the time the student completes this course, they will have the skills to be an effective student in any area.
Victus Study Skills Review

We received both the Student Workbook and Teacher Edition. Cub and I worked through the books together. The Student workbook is a slim, unobtrusive 68 page comb bound volume. The Teacher is a bit thicker, with tons of resources.

There are 3 areas covered in this study skills system:
Where is the student now,
where does the student want to be and
how does the student get there.

Where am I now is an inventory that covers current study skills and learning styles. Cub is a solid visual learner, but what surprised me was that he scored highest on kinesthetic learning. He is my fiddler

Where does the student want to be covers mission statement, goals/priorities,

How does the student get there covers time management, study environment, the PQRST system, note-taking, test prep and study skills.

In the Teacher Edition you'll find an Introduction the the Philosophy behind the program,
Section 1- Teacher Instructions,
Section 2- Lessons for the 3 areas stated above, delivered over 10 lessons. Each lesson includes a Purpose, Preparation and Procedure.
Section 3 is the Appendix and In addition there is an appendix with great resources such as organizational systems, time management assessments, mnemonic devices and more.  Comprehensive information to round out and deliver a complete lesson with very little teach prep time.

This is a comprehensive and excellent study skills program. It is recommended for students 5th grade and up. Cut is a rising 8th grader and found some of the material just "beyond" him. For instance, creating a mission statement 5 years ago, now, 5 years from now and 10 years from now simply left him puzzled. 5 years ago he was 9 and his mission was simply to get outside to play as quickly as possible. Some of the questions are more appropriate for older students with more life-experience and age appropriate clarity of the future. It's easy to go quickly over areas that might not be applicable and get to the areas that will be meaningful to every student; for instance, organization, study skills and time management.

This would be an excellent program to do individually or with a small group, for adult learners returning to school or for students of all ages who aren't clear about how to study.

I recommend every student entering high school take a study skills program. There are several on the market. Victus Study Skills System  is one of the best- simple, straightforward and comprehensive.

Teacher's Edition Physical Copy $40.00
Student Workbook Physical Copy $20.00

You can find Victus Study Skills System on Facebook and Twitter:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VictusStudySkillsSystem
Twitter: @VictusStudy

Click to read Crew Reviews
 
Review Crew

@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling- Flow, Grow and Tools

http://www.KindleExpert.com/GTD
 
I've written before about how I like to over plan for school- knowingly planning too much stuff at the outset and then when school hits going with the flow. This requires that I know what I'm doing- that I have my budget decided upon, I know where to acquire things from, have my curriculum, books and supplies gathered, my support in place (co-ops, class days, outsourcing) my books binned and carted, my CD's in their basket- in other words, stuff ready to roll.
 
At this point, homeschooling is not difficult work for me. It's been my vocation for a couple of decades, I've written a Master's thesis about it, spoken about it, blogged about it, started class-days, co-ops and Mom's groups- it's what I've done. I love education, I love kids, I love teaching. The only thing missing is money and more time.
 
Enter the working world. I'm currently working in a job that uses my degrees, is challenging, boasts a terrific corporate culture and compensates well. But I haven't been in the working world for awhile. Yes, I'm fairly familiar with computers but I'm the farthest thing from a computer nerd and so I've been on a bit of a learning curve of late. My job isn't IN computers but my job is possible because of computers.
 
Maybe you are on that same learning curve. Maybe you've been a working Mom and just brought your kids home to school. Or like me, you've homeschooled long enough to have your favorite curriculum catalogs and your routine is so established it s a no-brainer,  but you are now returning to work. Either way, you are growing. Growing is good. But like my 14 year old exhibits daily, it requires extra calories that are nutritious, more sleep than normal and plenty of fresh air and time to mull. Even with all of that, growing pains  and occasional break-downs are still just part of the routine. Growth is challenging. Growth also messes up our established routines and habits. We have undergone a massive transition this year. Our established routines are dis-established. Our habits are out of whack. We are in transition as we re-evaluate what is working and not working. We haven't don't much "flow" this year and we have realized that some of the tools that have been wonderful in the past just don't fit anymore.
 
Here's my advice. Be nice to yourself. Be gentle as you learn the ropes of either your job or of how to homeschool. It's O.K. not to know everything, to make mistakes, to ask questions. My supervisor gave me a great gift by telling that she expected me to be asking questions for at least a year. Pshew. What a relief. And as much as I hate to do it- having gained some mastery in an area or two over the years, the fact of the matter is that at certain things I'm a newbie. And I'm discovering whole new areas in which I'm challenged and I have to ask questions, make mistakes and admit I've messed up. So not my favorite thing to do. But necessary if I'm going to learn the job and have the ability to do it well.
 
To keep growing we have to find the experts in the areas we want to grow. Not everyone who claims to be an expert is. Not everyone speaking publicly or publishing books is either. Have discernment and choose people in the areas you need to grow in - while I've read many, many books on education, there are some I just wouldn't recommend to anyone. 
 
Like the chart at the top states, eliminate distractions and gather your tools. For me, this meant purchasing a new computer. For you it might mean buying a 3-hole punch or a printer, or a camera, or going to a conference, or making time to listen to MP3's of great homeschooling leaders. One of the greatest lessons I learned during our house rebuild was this: Set up and tear down often take as long as the actual task. The correct tools can make the difference between success and not happening.
I know not everyone is in the position to buy a new computer. Frankly, we looked at it as an investment. I couldn't do the job without it and it will make the time I'm at work infinitely more efficient.

Eliminating distractions has been more difficult. While I love our first floor open floor plan, working out of it is not very time efficient. Mainly because there are a zillion distractions. Growing often means learning how to manage distractions.
 
For investment's sake I treat homeschooling pedagogy and curriculum from an eliminate the distractions pove- the classical method simplifies most everything imho. We invest in non-consumables, simple and effective curriculum that does what it says it's going to to do, without costing a fortune. Distractions in the homeshcool world include but are not limited to the siren song of every.new.thing. Look, you don't have to try out stuff just because someone else says it's good or it works for their kid. My 14 year old does not and will not enjoy activity books or lap books, period. Investing in curriculum like that for him is a distraction and causes us both to suffer.
 
Gather your (management) tools. Evernote and Google Doc seem to be the tools of choice for a whole lot of Working Homeshcoolers. There's apps and daytimers and wall calendars. The important thing is to get something that works for you and use it. I like the thought of on-line apps but at heart I'm a paper and pencil gal and still need a calendar to write in. On Day #1 I talked about "Knowing Yourself." Know which tools will work for you.  Just like the best curriculum is that which you take down off the shelf and use, so too the best planning tools are the ones that you utilize. Management tools for our homeschool are simple- a list for each kid outlining their curriculum, coded by text, workbook, CD, MP3, PDF, on-line, etc. Train them to use the list. Ka-bam.

Call to Action
Inventory 3 areas you need to grow in and set SMART goals.
Identify 3 distractions to work and homeschool and set SMART goals to eliminate them.
Research 3 tools that would make your work and homeshcool more effective. Determine how to aquire them.

Be sure to stop by my fellow Crewbies for some more great reading this week.
Kathy @ Kathys Cluttered Mind ~ Fieldtripping Fun
Leah @ As We Walk Along the Road ~ Great Kids Reads
Shalynne @ Wonderfully Chaotic ~ Birth and Babies
Lisa Marie @ The Canadian Homeschooler ~ Canadian Teachers Pay Teachers Stores
Kemi @ Homemaking Organized ~ Homekeeping for Girls and Boys
Heather @ Only Passionate Curiosity ~ Planning Your Homeschool Year
Nikki @ Angels of Heart ~ Easter: The Cross for Preschoolers
Jenn @ Treasuring Life's Blessings ~ Family Friendly Finger Food
Lisa @ Golden Grasses ~ The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling

Also be sure to head over to Schoolhouse Review Crew Blog to see what all 60 of my fellow crew members are blogging about this week for their 5 day blog hop!
 


@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling Day- #2 Your Compelling Reason

Today's post in the series
The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling
has to do with defining your compelling reason.

Getting Things Done When There is Too Much To Do and Only ONE of YOU.
 
get things done - be decisive - http://www.organisemyhouse.com/be-decisive-how-to-get-things-done/
The biggest challenge working women have are in the areas of Time and Energy. There isn't enough of either one. If you homeschool AND work, you probably have less time than ever. Of course the best way to handle time challenges is to know why you are doing what you are doing and then make a plan and work your plan. In chatting with other homeschooling Moms who also work, by far the #1 challenge, is, as a friend says, "Managing Me."
focus, time management, delegate
And that's really the crux of making the whole thing work- the whole thing being staying healthy and save, keeping your job and educating your children. YOU are a resource, with limited time, energy and creativity and if you don't manage yourself, something will lose out. But let me take a load off from the get-go: something will lose out anyway, you won't get everything done, and you'll just have to let some things go.

Here's the real deal.  Educating your children is a job. You can outsource it, do it yourself or a combination thereof, but anyone who says it's free and easy is trying to justify or sell you something. How and where you educate your kids is one of the biggest parenting decisions you will make.

If you work you obviously have a job. Last time I looked 1 job + 1 job = 2 jobs. So, there you go. You are busy; very busy because you have not one, but two jobs. Congralations, you now qualify for Wonder Woman.

I am assuming that if you are undertaking the arduous task of managing 2 Jobs, you have a

Compelling Reason.

Are you clear about what it is? 
Write the vision and make it plain.
Personally, if  I don't write important things down and see it I'll forget all about them. . Then when the going gets tough (which it will, guaranteed) you can read your compelling reason and rest assured in your good choices. Or wonder at them, pray, wrestle and make different ones. Either way, it's a starting place and you need one, if you are going to successfully navigate the choppy waters of too much to do and not enough time to do it in. 
 
Your compelling reason is going to help you get and stay focused.
Compelling reasons can include but are not limited to social, emotional, spiritual, academic, physical, and familial concerns, among others. Among the working homeshcooling moms that I talked to in preparation for this series some of the compelling reasons were; their child was being bullied to the point of physical harm, their child was so depressed in school they had a suicide plan, their child has special academic needs better met at home, their child had health issues, they wanted better academics for their kids than the school provided, their child was very involved in a sport or artistic endeavor that took hours of training each day, their child was gifted or special needs or 2E, the family traveled for work, the family wanted more time together, Common Core implementation, etc. In other words, your compelling reason is going to be as unique and individual as you and your family is. Nevertheless, know what it is.

Our compelling reason is this:
Education is the transmission of culture.
I don't see the public (or often private, with a few exceptions) school system transmitting of culture of Christ, Truth and beauty. That's a deal breaker for us so we homeschool.

Once you have a compelling reason, you are going to want to focus the time and energy that you do have. If I get up earlier than everyone else and knock out 2-3 hours of work before breakfast, I can get about as much done as if I try to work during the entire morning while everyone is getting breakfast, milling about and grabbing my attention for math and to chat about whatever is on the news or in their reading. Multi- tasking is not effective and for me, simply means I waste more time and lose track of my notes. Not good in a detailed job that has seasons of extreme busyness.

How to stay focused at work, in order to truly maximize your time? As one of the gals mentioned when questioned:
"I keep schedule after schedule after schedule. And I work in routines. We always follow the same routines for school and for activities and for bedtime. And I follow the same routines for my working."
Find a planning format and routine that works for you and use it. Work and school habits also make life function much more smoothly.
In order to stay focused at work, especially as one of those people who has the privilege and distraction of working at home, my kids and I have had to become more flexible in how and when we do school. I written for years about the importance of quality "helpers" in your homeschool- CD's, DVD's, MP3's, on-line classes, computer classes, co-ops and class-days. On crazy busy days, my kids might listen to more school than they've read about. Or you might find us doing Spelling at 5:30 instead of in the morning, like we used to.

Here's how school is focused: A Master List for each kid with thier school work listed.
A Basket of CD's, DVD's; a Library Cart of school books and worktexts, a bin of memory cards, a flash-drive with MP3's and PDF downloads, a computer with log-ins and passwords in the memory.
If I'm working, the kids know that they can go to the list and pick something else. If I can't help them, they move on to the next thing they can do. If there's nothing else, they read, or they have free time to roam outside, create something, play with kittens, mull, write or read. Don't underestimate the importance of "free time" and "free play"- kids need time and space to just "be."

For those who are working outside of the home, this presents it's own unique set of problems in managing Homeshcool. Some moms have hired Nanny's who do the schoolwork, others have significant other's or in-laws who manage school, others work swing shifts and probably all of us don't sleep as much as we'd like.

Call to Action:
Define your compelling reasons to homeschool.
Define your compelling reasons to work.
Define 3 areas that require focus and create action steps to make your focus more effective.

I'd love to hear from you. What are your compelling reasons for Homeschooling while working. How do you stay focused at Work and at Home?

Be sure to stop by my fellow Crewbies for some more great reading this week.
Kathy @ Kathys Cluttered Mind ~ Fieldtripping Fun
Leah @ As We Walk Along the Road ~ Great Kids Reads
Shalynne @ Wonderfully Chaotic ~ Birth and Babies
Lisa Marie @ The Canadian Homeschooler ~ Canadian Teachers Pay Teachers Stores
Kemi @ Homemaking Organized ~ Homekeeping for Girls and Boys
Heather @ Only Passionate Curiosity ~ Planning Your Homeschool Year
Nikki @ Angels of Heart ~ Easter: The Cross for Preschoolers
Jenn @ Treasuring Life's Blessings ~ Family Friendly Finger Food
Lisa @ Golden Grasses ~ The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling

Also be sure to head over to Schoolhouse Review Crew Blog to see what all 60 of my fellow crew members are blogging about this week for their 5 day blog hop!
@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Monday, April 7, 2014

The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling - Day #1 Just 4 Things

Welcome to the Review Crew  "5 Days of" Blog Hop
This week I'll be posting,
The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling.
Homeschooling is growing by leaps and bounds and it seems like more families have 2 parents working while homeschooling than ever before. As part of every post I'll bring you some great graphics, some management helps and a call to action.

50 Things Highly Productive People Do Differently.  I have many of these traits but I'm not sure I'm being productive.

Found on lifehack.org
In preparation for this series I found an interesting book called the Power of Four by J. Marshall II (a Territories author) with a short list of 4 Things to make you a world class manager. It's totally apropos when considering or actually doing two huge jobs, such as both homeschooling and working, at once.

Know Yourself - this includes knowing your strengths and weaknesses as a worker and as homeschooler. This entails taking some regular assessments of yourself and building in time to celebrate, exercise, eat right, work out and listen to your inner muse, managing your sleep schedule, having fun and knowing when to unplug - especially difficult for those who work from home.

Most jobs include CEU's and SMART goals. For homeschooling I plan Continuing Ed. Thankfully, there are fantastic resources in the forms of magazine, MP3 downloads and Podcasts, as well as books.  Continuing education should shoring up your areas of weakness and maximize your strengths.

You know what you need to know for your job, or hopefully have a boss or customers that will let you know. As a homeschooler I'd like to encourage you to follow the first law of the teacher- know what you will be teaching. This means that you'll most likely be on a trail of learning the entire time you homeschool. Which, if you are an autodidact, couldn't be better news. The downside to this is time- as in its limited. The cool thing about homeschooling is that you can learn alongside your kids and you can maximize the time that you have together. Playing that audio book in the car, or having the CD on as you clean is a great way for everyone to learn as you go.


As always, you should make your goals
SMART - Specific, Manageable, Attainable, Reasonable, Time sensitive.
I  know I'd prefer to stay up till midnight to have time to work uninterrupted but I also know that I will be far more productive if I get up earlier instead of staying up later. That might not be the case for you. Make your goals smart and work within the parameters of your life.

As you set goals for your self and your year, address the "Basic 4" - physical, spiritual, mental and social. As working homeschoolers, perhaps the most difficult thing to do as you plan is to be realistic about the time and energy you have. If you are on a sharp learning curve at work, or studying for a licensing exam this year, maybe training for a marathon needs to wait until next year.

Know Your Friends - My friends include a list of very cool people from around the country ('cause we've lived there) and folks I've met around the world via the world wide web, our homeschooling group, church, work and my family. My friends also include CD's, DVD's, computers, Norwex cleaning rags, to-do lists and my calendar, Organo Gold Tea and Birkenstocks.  Tools are "friends' in the sense that they contribute to my life, and I appreciate them. Clearly I don't mean that I equate my shoes with my kids, but in the sense that my life is enriched by both, I'm appreciative. Knowing who to call for what and when will contribute greatly to your life.Cultivating your resources, when you are able, will enrich your life.

Know Your Enemies -Enemies of my little world include getting over committed, being too independent  the inability to make changes (like really learning Evernote), lack of resources (but I'm learning that you can google a how to for almost anything), not having the right tools, exhaustion, junk food, lack of exercise and not getting to the chiropractor on a regular basis. Your enemies list might not include an injury or health issue, but if does, organize to manage it.

Enemies also include real people. That "leader" at church that shames certain kids, relatives that undermined us as parents and homeschoolers, non and different flavored Christians who have mocked and scorned our faith, the jealous person at work or in the homeschool group who works hard to make you look bad. Be aware of those types and love them as you can, but also be wise in your dealings with these people. The enemy of our souls comes to kill, steal and destroy us, our health, finances, families, dreams, visions and hopes. Keep guard over that which is precious to you and keep those who would take what you've been given to steward at a safe distance.

Some people or "things" can be both friends and enemies -  Facebook also comes to mind. For me, it's a great tool to connect with others through groups and as a professional support system. But it can also be a huge time suck, cause me to feel inadequate and jealous and is a great excuse to pretend I'm multi-tasking, when in fact I'm just procrastinating.

Know your enemies. And know your friends well enough so that you can recognize when they've crossed into a different camp.

Take the Lead -Mary Kay used to a have a slogan that went like this, "If it's to be, it's up to me." I always had a problem with that form a theological point of view. If it's to be it seems like it's up to God. Hopefully I can come alongside of Him enough to get to be part of the main thing and part of the main stream. That being said, if there are opportunities that are missing in your fair city, create them. If you need it, chances are someone else does too. Volunteering is a great way to network professionally and create a richer, more diverse and wider circle of influence.

In, Up Till Now, William Shatner's autobiography, he makes the point that he's always willing to say "Yes," to take a risk and to do things others might have felt were beneath them professionally. In other words, he embraced opportunities no matter how crazy and out of the way and bizarre they might have seemed. As a result he has had varied and uninterrupted career(s) doing things he's loved.

I've been criticized long and well for my lack of satisfaction in life-  too many expectations, to high of expectations, too many degrees, too many kids, too many moves, and on and on. My lack of satisfaction and our hope and desire for more in life has lead us to live from coast to coast, read thousands of books, call people we don't know on the phone, develop friendships that have changed our lives, have a ton of kids and frankly, marry each other. So, really, naysayers be d*amned. Embrace life, take the lead and do something to nurture and satisfy and stir up the inner hopes and dreams, and then say "YES!" when opportunity shows up. Which is exactly why many of us are Homeschooling AND Working. More to come this week!

Call to Action:
Define 2 goals for each of the four areas of life
Determine your friends and your Enemies.
Define 4 areas in which you need to take the lead.

Be sure to stop by my talented blogger buddies sites for some more great reading this week:

Kathy @ Kathys Cluttered Mind ~ Fieldtripping Fun
Leah @
As We Walk Along the Road ~ Great Kids Reads
Shalynne @
Wonderfully Chaotic ~ Birth and Babies
Lisa Marie @
The Canadian Homeschooler ~ Canadian Teachers Pay Teachers Stores
Kemi @
Homemaking Organized ~ Homekeeping for Girls and Boys
Heather @
Only Passionate Curiosity ~ Planning Your Homeschool Year
Nikki @
Angels of Heart ~ Easter: The Cross for Preschoolers
Jenn @
Treasuring Life's Blessings ~ Family Friendly Finger Food
Lisa @
Golden Grasses ~ The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling

Also be sure to head over to Schoolhouse Review Crew Blog to see what all 60 of my fellow crew members are blogging about this week for their 5 day blog hop!


@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Friday, April 4, 2014

A Week

*1*
ends soon! 

*2*
Dr. Dh and I will be part of a panel on homeschooling tomorrow from 2-4 p.m. at Memorial Lutheran. We've been collecting questions from newbies and those interested in homeschooling for various reasons. If you or someone you know what's inspiration, resources and ideas on education that goes beyond the norm please invite them!

*3*
It was a busy week, full of too much too do and the lot of us fighting something viral in the form of headaches, fevers and runny noses. On top of it all, the weather was cyclothymic and went from 50 degrees to blizzard conditions and back again.
The redemptive event of the week was a litter of kittens. Missy, our lottery cat, won at the fair, is the proud Momma of 6 little cuties, and had the good sense to come on the back-porch and deliver in the box Flower set out for her, instead of in the howling storm outside. It's been cold outside, so they are in. I am so cool I am letting them stay in till it warms up and taking allergy meds by the boatload to compensate.

*4*
Along with over 60 bloggers, I'll be participating next week in 5 day Blog Hop. Next week is an everything goes kind of week so the topics run the gamut and will included tons of give-away's. My series will is titled 
The Working Woman's Guide to Homeschooling
I've had the opportunity to talk with many homeschoolers who are working part and full time and have some great stuff lined up!
*5*
Recent Reviews: 
Jill R. Ehm-Creator's photo.
Around the World in 80 Days- Poppins Book Nook Club

*6*
The kids spent a couple of days listening to the 

The Brinkman Adventures

 just right when you are too sick to do math. This has been a surprise win for us this year. True life missionary stories. The kids have been wowed and inspired. Full review to come

*7*
Went to a Peasch (Passover) presentation by Chosen People ministry. The mnemonics are powerful reminders of God's love for us, His unfailing knowledge of how we need to go over the basics again and again and how His story is woven throughout History so thoroughly that the two are inseparable. Great, great stuff. Links to Passover resources here




@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Little Bits of Heaven

 
These sweet little things made their appearance the morning after our April 1 Blizzard.  
Sucker that I am, they are snug in the house and my allergies are rocking and rolling. While Cub lounged around nursing a fever, Flower did lots of "Cat Science" for school today.
 
Flower is calling them "Little Bits of Heaven." And to her, they are.
 
@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Captivated by Media Talk - TOS Review

"Television is an invention that permits you to be entertained in your living room by people you wouldn't have in your house." David FrostCaptivated Movie Review
Media Talk 101 is dedicated to bringing awareness about the effects and challenges of living in a media saturated world.
 To that end they created Captivated DVD.
 
Like the above quote, this movie was not created to put your mind at ease about media consumption. This DVD was created to get you thinking about the media consumption that takes place in your home and in your family.
 
Some of the questions asked in this presentation:
  • Has today's connectivity drawn us closer to one another or strangely more disjointed?
  • is our social experience richer and deeper or more shallow an artificial.
Captivated Movie Review
Captivated DVD's purpose is to get you thinking about your own media consumption and being proactive consumers, rather than reactive and passive consumers of media.
 
Some interesting statistics:
  • According to a recent report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the average teen spends 7.5 hours a day consuming media. It’s nearly 11 hours a day if you count media multi-tasking.
  • It was recently reported that YouTube has now reached 2 billion video views a day and 24 hours of new video are being uploaded each minute.
  •  Another study reported that the average person watches 4.7 hours of television every day. Life expectancy in the U.S. is currently 77.8 years so if you happen to be average then that would equal 15 years of your life just watching TV.
  • It is estimated that the average mobile teen sends and receives 2,899 text messages per month.
  •  Did you know that 43% of 3-4 year olds have a TV in their bedroom?
This DVD gives you stats, talks to experts, shares testimonies, explains media addiction and hopes to leave the viewer questioning their own media consumption.
I'm old enough to be pre-media. My Dad grew up in on a rural farm amongst hard working German farmers. He remembers getting in-door plumbing, electricity, a household phone and the families first T.V. He was a  voracious reader and his kids were expected to follow suite. Which we did.
I grew up in a home that didn't watch T.V. much- not that there was much to watch- 3 channels that were often fuzzy.
I live in a home that is not that media rich. Dr. Dh and I are voracious readers and we expect our kids to follow suite. Which they do.
And yet, among the 5 of us living here there are 4 lap-tops, 4 cell phones, including a Smartie, a big-screen T.V. a car with a DVD player and a Nook. Yeah, we're not THAT media rich, and yet writing it all down makes me realize just how media rich we have become. Part of that richness has to do with a couple of jobs. The Smart Phone and 1 lap top are job dedicated, which takes us down a notch on the media- hip scale, but then again, if I didn't have a FB, Pinterest and Twitter account, one of my jobs would be a lot harder. And frankly, I wouldn't have my primary job without the one that requires all of the media connections; and the Nook was a job perk. So, while I'm mindful of our media consumption, we also totally appreciate it and utilize media.
Dr. Dh and the kid and I watched this together one Sunday afternoon. Dr. Dh is a psychologist with a serious interest in neuro-psychology. A lot of what this DVD talks about is a growing concern for him. He, and the Christian therapists that he works with, have, anecdotally, seen a real decline in personal maturity, accountability and faith in the past many years. They see it as a result of the media immersion most people soak themselves in morning, noon and night.

Our family is old school in that we are more word than image based. And I plan to keep it that way. This video just underscored our previous decisions to do so and gave us food for thought about the growing media consumption that we are involved with. This movie is a great addition to ones apologetics program for Jr. and Sr. High, to show at a homeschool Mom's meeting, for Sunday School and to share with your church library. Social media is here to stay- that's just fact. But being mindful consumers, and teaching our kids to be so as well, is plain old good stewardship. This film and the compatible web-site will give you the information, tools and impetus to be that good steward. Highly recommended for all ages. 
Captivated Movie Review

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CaptivatedTheMovie
Twitter: @CaptivatedMovie

You can watch over 15 video clips of the Captivated DVD to see if it's right for your family.
You can purchase the Captivated DVD for $16.95 (free shipping), and right now there is also a special offer going on: if you order 2 DVDs, you get the second one for only $5!

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@Golden Grasses 2008-2013. All photographs, artwork and text are the property of the owner unless otherwise stated. Don't miss a thing! Subscribe to Golden Grasses and get our articles right to your inbox!